Certain construction workers and other employees in the construction industry must be paid the entire balance of accrued and unused paid sick leave if those workers separate from employment before they reach their 90th day of employment. This requirement, effective January 1, 2024, applies regardless of whether a worker’s separation is voluntary or involuntary.

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In welcome news for employers, the Chicago City Council passed an amendment to the new Chicago Paid Leave and Paid Sick and Safe Leave Ordinance, which will delay implementation of paid leave requirements from December 31, 2023, to July 1, 2024. The ordinance significantly expands paid leave requirements for Chicago employers and includes some of

The National Labor Relations Board and Occupational Safety and Health Administration executed a Memorandum of Understanding on October 31, 2023, that will help facilitate interagency coordination and cooperation. The goal of this partnership is to strengthen health and safety protections for workers.

The MOU sets forth a process for information sharing, training, and outreach between

In August 2023, the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona joined “the growing number of courts that have concluded” that judicial approval of Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) settlements “is neither authorized or necessary.” In Evans v. Centurion Managed Care of Arizona LLC[1], the plaintiff asserted individual claims under the FLSA for unpaid overtime and failure to pay minimum wages. Following the parties’ settlement of the plaintiff’s claims on an individual basis, the parties moved for approval of the settlement, submitting to the court a redacted version of the settlement agreement and a joint motion to file portions of the settlement agreement, including the settlement amount, under seal.Continue Reading District of Arizona Addresses Judicial Approval of Individual Fair Labor Standards Act Settlements

As reported earlier this year, California’s state minimum wage increased to $15.50 per hour for all employers on January 1, 2023. However, some California employers may face another minimum wage increase on July 1, 2023. This is due to the adoption by many cities and counties in California of their own local minimum wage rates above the California state minimum wage for employees working within their jurisdiction. If a locality provides a higher minimum wage rate than the state rate, the employer must pay the higher local wage rate.Continue Reading Minimum Wage Increases To Take Place on July 1, 2023, for Some California Localities

In Mathews v. USA Today Sports Media Group, LLC et al., plaintiff Elizabeth Mathews (Mathews) brought a collective action under the FLSA alleging that she was an employee rather than an independent contractor to the defendant. Mathews moved for conditional certification pursuant to the widely followed two-step conditional FLSA certification process adopted in Lusardi v. Xerox Corp, 118 F.R.D. 351 (D.N.J. 1987). Under this approach, an initial collective certification determination is made using a lenient standard—that proposed members of a collective are similar enough to receive notice of the lawsuit so the proposed collective member may decide whether to affirmatively join the lawsuit. In the second step, which occurs after collective certification discovery has been completed, the district court makes a second decision when the employer moves for “decertification” of the collective, using a stricter standard, to determine whether the named plaintiffs and opt-in members are “similarly situated.”Continue Reading Eastern District of Virginia Follows the Fifth Circuit’s One-Step Certification Approach for Collective Actions Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)

As California Governor Gavin Newsom’s administration seeks to finalize the 2023-24 Governor’s Budget, the California Joint Legislative Audit Committee has moved to audit the persistent backlog of wage theft cases at the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement. The audit is set to begin September 1, 2023, absent developments demonstrating to the committee an investigation is

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled in Helix Energy Solutions Group v. Hewitt that a daily-rate worker who earned over $200,000 annually was not exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act’s overtime requirements. In an opinion authored by Justice Elena Kagan, the Court held that compensation based on a daily rate did not satisfy the