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Katelyn Sullivan focuses her practice on employment litigation and counseling, representing clients in a wide range of cases involving discrimination, harassment, retaliation, wrongful termination, the Americans with Disabilities Act and wage and hour issues.

The county of Los Angeles’ new Fair Workweek Ordinance will take effect on July 1, 2025. The Ordinance comes after the city of Los Angeles passed a similar ordinance in 2022 and has the stated purpose of both supporting retail workers in the county by providing fair workweek protections, and promoting the health, safety, and welfare of retail workers by providing more predictable work schedules that ensure stability for them and their families. Generally, the Ordinance requires retail businesses with 300 or more employees globally to follow certain scheduling restrictions. The Ordinance applies to businesses in the North American Industry Classification System within the retail trade categories and subcategories 44 through 45. It covers employees who work at least two hours per workweek within the unincorporated areas of the county of Los Angeles and are entitled to minimum wage under California law.Continue Reading Los Angeles County Approves Fair Workweek Ordinance

The California Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) issued updated responses to frequently asked questions (FAQs) relating to the state’s amended paid sick leave law. As previously reported, California enacted SB 616, which expands the state law with respect to paid sick leave. The new law will be effective January 1, 2024, and increases the minimum amount of sick leave per year from 24 hours (or three days) to 40 hours (or five days). California’s labor commissioner also updated the paid sick leave poster and 2810.5 employee notice to reflect the new law’s requirements. The DIR’s FAQs page answers questions for employers regarding accrual methods, caps on paid sick leave, and how employers can transition their paid sick leave policies to comply with the new law. For example, the FAQs address what an employer must do to comply with the law on January 1, 2024, if the employer uses an accrual method and capped an employee’s yearly use of leave at three days or 24 hours: —”If an employer uses an annual start date other than January 1 and implements a 12‑month use cap, that cap must change to 40 hours or 5 days on January 1, 2024. For example, if an employer uses the 12-month period of May 1 – April 30 and implements a cap and an employee used 24 hours or three days before January 1, 2024, the employer must allow the employee to use an additional 2 days or 16 hours before April 30 if the employee has accrued that additional leave.”Continue Reading California Revises Frequently Asked Questions on Paid Sick Leave

Oregon has three separate minimum wages that vary based on work location and inflation (as applicable), which are labeled Portland Metro, Standard, and Nonurban. The Standard minimum wage is applicable to the counties of Benton, Clatsop, Columbia, Deschutes, Hood River, Jackson, Josephine, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Polk, Tillamook, Wasco, Yamhill, and parts of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington outside the urban growth boundary. The Standard minimum wage is $14.20 per hour between July 1, 2023, and June 30, 2024. It will be adjusted annually, effective July 1, based on the increase, if any, to the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers for the US City Average.Continue Reading Oregon Slated To Increase Minimum Wage Effective July 1, 2024

California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law SB 525, which provides a tiered approach for minimum wages for the state’s healthcare workers. The law sets forth detailed descriptions of which types of healthcare facilities are covered and which employees are covered by the law. Covered employees include “an employee of a health care facility employer who provides patient care, health care services, or services supporting the provision of health care, which includes, but is not limited to, employees performing work in the occupation of a nurse, physician, caregiver, medical resident, intern or fellow, patient care technician, janitor, housekeeping staff person, groundskeeper, guard, clerical worker, nonmanagerial administrative worker, food service worker, gift shop worker, technical and ancillary services worker, medical coding and medical billing personnel, scheduler, call center and warehouse worker, and laundry worker, regardless of formal job title.” The law may also apply to contracted or subcontracted employees if (1) the employee’s employer contracts with the healthcare facility employer, or with a contractor or subcontractor to the healthcare facility employer, to provide healthcare services, or services supporting the provision of healthcare and (2) the healthcare facility employer directly or indirectly, or through an agent or any other person, exercises control over the employee’s wages, hours, or working conditions. There are also some defined exclusions from the law; for example, individuals who perform delivery or waste collection work on the premises of a covered healthcare facility or medical transportation services in or out of a covered healthcare facility are excluded, provided that the worker is not an employee of any person that owns, controls, or operates a covered healthcare facility.Continue Reading California Raises Minimum Wage for Healthcare Workers Effective June 1, 2024

In the latest development in California’s evolving independent contractor laws, the Los Angeles City Council approved a new ordinance that provides protections for certain independent contractors providing services in Los Angeles. Beginning on July 1, 2023, the Freelance Worker Protections Ordinance (Ordinance) requires that any contract between a hiring entity and a freelance worker valued at $600 or more (either by itself or when combined with previous written or oral contracts between the parties in a given calendar year) be in writing and include, among other things: (1) an itemization of all services the freelance worker provides, (2) the value of the services to be provided pursuant to the contract, and (3) the date by which the entity must pay the contracted compensation or the manner by which that payment date will be determined. Under the Ordinance, a freelance worker is an individual natural person, or an entity whose interests are entirely held by and whose work is performed entirely by no more than one individual natural person. A hiring entity is defined as an entity regularly engaged in business or commercial activity, including a nonprofit business, but excluding companies that hire app-based transportation and delivery drivers to provide prearranged services.Continue Reading Freelance Worker Protections Ordinance for Independent Contractors in Los Angeles

As reported earlier this year, California’s state minimum wage increased to $15.50 per hour for all employers on January 1, 2023. However, some California employers may face another minimum wage increase on July 1, 2023. This is due to the adoption by many cities and counties in California of their own local minimum wage rates above the California state minimum wage for employees working within their jurisdiction. If a locality provides a higher minimum wage rate than the state rate, the employer must pay the higher local wage rate.Continue Reading Minimum Wage Increases To Take Place on July 1, 2023, for Some California Localities

The City of Los Angeles’ Fair Work Week Ordinance will take effect on April 1, 2023. Generally, the Fair Work Week Ordinance requires retail businesses in Los Angeles with 300 employees or more to follow certain scheduling restrictions. The ordinance applies to businesses in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) within the retail trade categories

Over the past several years, California has gradually increased the state’s minimum wage rate, resulting in the most recent increase, effective January 1, 2023, to $15.50 per hour for all employers. This minimum wage rate applies to all employees, subject to a few limited exceptions. This increase also affects the minimum annual salary requirement for exempt employees. Under California law, exempt employees must be paid a threshold annual salary of two times the state minimum wage for full-time employment. Accordingly, effective January 1, 2023, the minimum salary for otherwise exempt employees increased to $64,480.00 a year.Continue Reading California Minimum Wage Requirements Effective January 1, 2023

In November 2022, the Los Angeles City Council passed the Fair Work Week Ordinance, which requires retail businesses in Los Angeles with 300 employees or more to follow certain scheduling restrictions. The ordinance applies to businesses in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) within the retail trade categories and subcategories 44 through 45. It covers employees who work at least two hours per workweek within the city of Los Angeles and are entitled to minimum wage under California law.Continue Reading Los Angeles Fair Work Week Ordinance Imposes New Wage and Hour Requirements for Certain Retail Businesses