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Chris Wilkinson maintains a broad litigation and advice practice in labor and employment, wage-and-hour, federal contractor compliance, equal pay, government relations, and administrative law. He represents multinational employers, advising and counseling on the full range of employment and compliance matters arising out of federal and state laws.

Chris’ current practice focuses on counseling employers and litigating pay equity matters arising out of federal and state claims. He helps clients navigate large-scale government investigations and litigation arising out of discrimination, retaliation, whistleblower, and other enforcement matters. He also investigates highly sensitive matters at the executive level, ensures legal compliance in diversity and inclusion efforts, and strategizes regarding labor and employment risks arising out of the COVID-19 pandemic.

On June 30, 2024, in Washington, D.C., the Wage Transparency Omnibus Amendment Act of 2023 (Act) will go into effect after surviving a 30-day congressional review period. With this Act, Washington, D.C., joins a growing group of jurisdictions with pay transparency laws, including California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Nevada, New York, Rhode Island, and

Employers are increasingly using artificial intelligence (AI)-powered systems to monitor employee activities ranging from schedules and timecards to performance. In previous updates and podcasts, we have closely tracked the federal government’s efforts in these areas. Against this backdrop, the U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division released a Field Assistance Bulletin addressing

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a final rule on April 23, 2024, increasing the minimum salary and compensation thresholds for certain overtime exemptions (the Final Rule) under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The Final Rule has a stated effective date of July 1, 2024. The FLSA mandates that employers pay nonexempt employees

The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council issued a Proposed Rule, “Pay Equity and Transparency in Federal Contracting,” on January 30, 2024. The Proposed Rule would amend the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FARs), which apply to federal government commercial contracts to be principally performed in the United States and its territories. The rule imposes three new requirements

On January 12, 2024, Washington, D.C., joined the growing list of jurisdictions to enact wage transparency legislation when Mayor Muriel Bowser signed the Wage Transparency Omnibus Amendment Act of 2023 (the Act), formerly known as the Pay Scale and Benefits Disclosure Amendment Act. If the Act survives the 30-day congressional review period, during which Congress can vote to overrule it, the law will take effect June 30, 2024.

The new law applies to all employers with at least one employee in Washington, D.C. and requires employers to include pay ranges in job listings and disclose healthcare benefits information to applicants. The Act also prohibits employers from inquiring about an applicant’s salary history.Continue Reading Washington, D.C., Set To Enact Wage Transparency Law

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on August 30, 2023, which proposes revisions to the regulations issued under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). The proposed rule seeks to increase the federal minimum salary threshold required for employees to qualify as exempt employees to roughly $55,000 per year.Continue Reading Department of Labor Seeks To Raise the Federal Minimum Salary Required To Qualify as an Exempt Employee for Fair Labor Standards Act Purposes

In O’Reilly v. Daugherty Systems, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit[1] ruled that, for purposes of the Equal Pay Act (EPA) claim, greater experience can serve as a legitimate reason for a pay differential on March 29, 2023. Affirming the district court’s grant of summary judgment for the defendant, the Eighth Circuit held that differences in skillset and experience between a plaintiff and a single comparator can establish that a pay disparity between them was based on a factor other than sex, an affirmative defense to an EPA claim. The recent decision adds one more notch in the developing question of what constitutes a legitimate reason for pay differences under the EPA.Continue Reading Eighth Circuit Pushes Back Against Using More Experienced Comparators in EPA Claims

The U.S. Supreme Court recently ruled in Helix Energy Solutions Group v. Hewitt that a daily-rate worker who earned over $200,000 annually was not exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act’s overtime requirements. In an opinion authored by Justice Elena Kagan, the Court held that compensation based on a daily rate did not satisfy the

Legal, political, and social movements have pushed pay equity to the top of many organizations’ priorities. Activist shareholder proposals, changes in state laws, Biden administration efforts, and calls from employees regarding greater transparency have spurred employers to find out where they stand. In this episode of Workplace Rules, Senior Counsel Chris Wilkinson, who

On July 29, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) rescinded a final rule issued under the Trump administration that had narrowed the definition of a vertical joint employment relationship under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). There will be a greater likelihood that joint employment relationships will be found after the rescission takes effect on September 28, 2021.
Continue Reading Department of Labor Rescinds Joint Employer Test Under the FLSA