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Adam Weiner counsels employers of all sizes regarding discrimination and harassment, wage-and-hour compliance, employee performance management, leaves of absence, handbooks and personnel policies, reductions in force, independent contractors, separation agreements, restrictive covenants, and other labor and employment issues.

On January 1, 2024, the Illinois Minimum Wage will rise to $14 per hour for individual who are 18 years and older. New employees in the first 90 days of employment over the age of 18 may be paid up to 50 cents less per hour. Youths under the age of 18 who work fewer than 650 hours per calendar year may be paid $12 per hour. Tipped employees may be paid 60% of the hourly minimum wage, which for 2024 will be $8.40. The state minimum wage applies to employers of four or more employees.Continue Reading Illinois Minimum Wage Increases on January 1, 2024

Following Chicago’s last-minute changes to its much-discussed Paid Leave Ordinance, Cook County has joined the recent flurry of legislating in Illinois to amend its own leave requirements. On December 14, 2023, the Cook County Board of Commissioners passed the Cook County Paid Leave Ordinance, which amends the prior Cook County Earned Sick Leave Ordinance to

Governor J.B. Pritzker signed into law HB 3129, an amendment to the Illinois Equal Pay Act that changes how employers can advertise for position openings in Illinois, on August 11, 2023. The amendment goes into effect January 1, 2025, and requires all employers with 15 or more employees to provide pay scale and benefits information in

Illinois Governor Jay Pritzker signed into law the Paid Leave for All Workers Act (PLFAW) on March 13, 2023, adopting the bill that the Illinois General Assembly passed on January 10, 2023. The law guarantees all Illinois workers at least 40 hours of paid leave (or a pro rata amount, depending on the number of

The Illinois legislature, on January 10, 2023, passed the Paid Leave for All Workers Act (PLFAW), which Governor Pritzker announced he will sign into law. Should the bill be enacted, Illinois would become the third state (after Maine and Nevada) to require private employers to provide employees with earned paid leave to use for any

In October 2022, the Supreme Court of Virginia ruled that an individual cannot face personal liability as an “employer” under the Virginia Wage Payment Act (VWPA). The decision both clarifies Virginia law and serves as an important reminder for employers (and their managers and supervisors) that many states can impose personal liability on individuals for wage-and-hour claims.Continue Reading Personal Liability for Wage Claims? Virginia Says ‘No,’ but Other States Say ‘Yes’

Employers with Michigan employees should remain vigilant to the likelihood of profound changes to the state’s wage-and-hour laws, including a new sick leave obligation, an increase in the minimum wage to $12.00 an hour, and a phase-out of the tipped employee wage classification. Pending the outcome of current litigation, these changes could take effect as soon as February 21, 2023.

On July 19, 2022, the Michigan Court of Claims[1] in Mothering Justice v. Nessel held that the state legislature’s amendment of two 2018 ballot initiatives was unconstitutional. The initiatives are the Improved Workforce Opportunity Wage Act (IWOWA) (the minimum wage law) and the Paid Medical Leave Act (PMLA), formerly the Earned Sick Time Act. Mothering Justice is currently stayed until February 20, 2023. On August 5, 2022, the Michigan attorney general filed a joint motion for expedited appeal. The Michigan Court of Appeals—and perhaps the state Supreme Court—will decide whether the IWOWA and the PMLA must be enacted as originally submitted to the legislature or as the legislature later amended them.Continue Reading Michigan Wage and Hour Laws on the Move?